What I love about “Millennial Money”

by | May 22, 2020

It’s probably not surprising that, since starting at Zogo, I’ve become a little more introspective about how I manage my own money. 

Like a lot of people my age, I like to hop on YouTube to pass the time and watch a couple videos. Recently, I’ve been watching a lot of one series: “Millennial Money.”

Millennial Money” comes from CNBC’s Make It, a brand of the business news company that focuses on personal finance. The YouTube channel features lots of bite-size finance videos, from real-life budget breakdowns to tips from money management gurus. 

The “Millennial Money” show features twenty and thirty-somethings that live in major metropolitan areas of the U.S. Each week’s subject breaks down their income streams, investments and budget. They talk about how they’re planning for retirement, where they spend their money and what their goals are for the future. 

I watched nearly every available episode of the show in a matter of days. I like the way it teaches practical lessons about money and the way it focuses on the lives of real people, some of whom have made mistakes in their financial lives. To put it bluntly, “Millennial Money” made learning about personal finance easy — and fun. 

One of my favorite parts of “Millennial Money” is that it helps me envision myself as a secure and successful adult working toward financial independence. In school and in life, we’re given a pretty vague picture of what success looks like — a great job, a good education, lots of money. But what really makes something a great job? Is it a good education if it drives you into debt? And where is all that money supposed to come from? 

“Millennial Money” helps me break down some of those questions. And it makes me wonder: if there were more resources like this out there — easy to grasp, fun to engage with and in a quick, convenient format that people my age are already so familiar with — could we revitalize financial education, and help today’s young people build better futures? 

I guess that’s what Zogo and “Millennial Money” have in common.

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